contact us | disclaimer
Click here to subscribe to newsletter and more..
.
Articles & Testimonials
Communication Art
Healing Art
Performance Art
Living Art Opportunities
Visual Art Shopping
Schedule & Events
Member Area
View Shopping Cart
Site Map
Transformational Breakthru
Body Therapy Trainings
Web-based Training
Individual Treatment
Practitioner Class
Downloads
Clowning classes
Court Jester for Hire
Gift Certificate
Audio performances
Video Performances
Astrology Readings
Interesting Sites
Social Networking
Creativity Retreat
BATIK Art-to-Wear
Art Gallery
Free Greeting Cards
Visual Art Testimonials
 
Siren Flowing
Siren Flowing

Thjis lovely image suggests a Siren*, in the form of a female figure, playing an ancient instrument as the sea flows through her, through her hair and the music... The feeling of flow throughout this composition is brought even more by all the shapes being circular and spiral ~ notice, there are no hard edges here! This gives fresh meaning to the expression: "My vulnerability is my strength. Sharing my caring is my strength. My tenderness, the fullest expression of my humanity, this is my renewing and developing strength."

*In Greek mythology, the Sirens are creatures with the head of a female and the body of a bird. They lived on an island (Sirenum scopuli; three small rocky islands) and with the irresistible charm of their song they lured mariners to their destruction on the rocks surrounding their island (Virgil V, 846; Ovid XIV, 88).

Here is a quote from Homer's "The Odyssey" that describes these Siren's more in detail: "The Argonauts escaped them because when he heard their song, Orpheus immediately realized the peril they were in. He took out his lyre and sang a song so clear and ringing that it drowned the sound of those lovely fatal voices. When on another journey the Odysseus' ship passed the Sirens, had the sailors stuff their ears with wax. He had himself tied to the mast for he wanted to hear their beautiful voices. The Sirens sang when they approached, their words even more enticing than the melody. They would give knowledge to every man who came to them, they said, ripe wisdom and a quickening of the spirit. Odysseys' heart ran with longing but the ropes held him and the ship quickly sailed to safer waters (Odyssey XII, 39).

Homer mentions only two sirens, but later authors mention three or four. They were regarded as the daughters of Phorcys, or the storm god Achelous and either Melpone, Sterope, or Terpsichore. Libanius on the other hand relates that they were born of the blood of Achelous when he was wounded by Heracles. According to Ovid, they were nymphs and the play-mates of Persephone.

Size:
Price:
Qty: